Dr. Joe Dispenza talks about how our unconscious programming of the mind is rooted in the deepest depths of our self.

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Photo by Zulmaury Saavedra on Unsplash

Dr. Joe Dispenza is a renowned chiropractor, neuroscientist, teacher, and author who trains people in using the law of attraction to create the life they desire.

We all store our own traumas, whether it be consciously or unconsciously. We have an abundance of life experiences that have led us to experience all the feelings on the spectrum of emotions. We have endured heartache, physical pain, change, and longing. Throughout our childhood, primarily during the first seven years of life, we have been programmed by those around us — our parents, teachers, peers, the media, and even strangers. …

We can find the light at the end of the tunnel, together.

girl-holding-graduation-cap-reminiscing-on-entire-year-2020–2021-with-covid-growing-through-life
girl-holding-graduation-cap-reminiscing-on-entire-year-2020–2021-with-covid-growing-through-life
Photo by Anna Earl on Unsplash

A year ago this week, I had just finished my last semester at Rutgers University. I had begun to viciously apply for jobs, amidst chaotic unpacking and mentally settling in to life at home again. Gratitude for a lack of any student loans swooned over me. Though, nerves overtook me because I had no clue where life would take me. I contemplated what I’d land with a Bachelors in psychology. I kicked myself for many months, feeling stupid for all the “mistakes” I had made through my education.

A year later and I have a full-time gig that I absolutely adore. I have the chance to work with children and hold a managerial position where I have built rapport and accumulated skills. I paid off my car, and began diving into the art of investing. I have dug deeper into my passion of singing. My small business, a Spritz of Suz was launched. My heart swelled as I continued to build and layer my writing portfolio. This month, January 2021, is one year on Medium.

An extrovert’s dilemma at a time of a global pandemic.

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Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

As an extrovert, Covid has been especially hard for me. In time, I have become accustomed to spending more time alone and getting to know myself better. I have explored deeper parts of myself than I have ever done before and I healed parts of me that I didn’t know were broken. I learned how to entertain myself and maintain productivity and fulfillment on days when I didn’t have any reason to get out of bed… on days when depression overcame me.

Eventually I got a full-time job…my first one post grad. I didn’t get the chance to have a graduation, and for the first six months afterwords, I wondered what my life would turn into. I felt hopeless like the rest of the world, and in time my new position gave me a sense of purpose. …

I believe in taking your meds, but find it useful to consider how the way we think affects our mental patterns.

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Photo by Halacious on Unsplash

When people are diagnosed with a mental health issue, they are likely to experience bouts of sadness, low energy/fatigue, and mood swings among other feelings and symptoms. If and when someone is professionally diagnosed with anxiety or depression, patients are rarely informed of what is causing this issue in their life. The root cause of these mental issues are infrequently found on the surface. These depressive symptoms may be deep-rooted in childhood trauma. They could have evolved out of repressed emotions, or the suppression of resentment. …

And it’s probably the best resolution I have ever had.

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Photo by Danil Aksenov on Unsplash

New Year’s Eve is typically a time of year filled with hope and exhilaration for the chance at a new start. To me, the new year fills like the first page of a blank journal. My story is waiting to be written, and my thoughts, behaviors, feelings, and decisions will all determine my future. Each page will be filled with stories of memories that will continuously shape my character. …

I am grateful for emotional release.

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Photo by Aliyah Jamous on Unsplash

With every new person I meet, I learn more about myself an others around me. I realize that there is only so much that one can give until they are left feeling empty. I am reminded that there is nothing we can do to change others. We can express how we feel when boundaries are crossed or we feel we have been disrespected. And at the end of the day, the only person that we can change is ourselves.

And that isn’t a bad thing. Living with my heart wide open has granted me such magical life experiences and wise life lessons. With each new experience I have in life, it helps me to love myself more. I am forced to grow and evolve and be made uncomfortable. When I am faced with difficult decisions or I am overflowing with doubt, I am able to tune in to my intuitive mind. …

A meat eater's (attempted) defense of the consumption of livestock.

young caucasian girl holding poop emoji cookie  in front of her face with two hands. cookie has googly eyes and smily face.
young caucasian girl holding poop emoji cookie  in front of her face with two hands. cookie has googly eyes and smily face.
Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash

If I had a nickel for every time someone asked me where I get my b12 from, I’d be filthy stinking rich. I’m vegan. I have been for over two years now, and hey — I'm doing pretty darn good, considering my increased energy, brighter skin, and happier disposition among other things.

Unfortunately, most people are led to believe that b12 is a vitamin exclusively found in animal products and that vegans and vegetarians are simply destined for a deficiency in this essential nutrient. Well, it turns out that isn’t the case. Trust me, I was just as shocked as you are. …

And I have never been happier.

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Photo by Paul Zoetemeijer on Unsplash

I was raised Catholic. I was involved with the church choir and as a child I wanted to become a nun. As I aged and received my Sacraments, I became involved with bible study. I attended weekly with a friend and enjoyed the history behind the stories this sacred book told. Honestly, I never believed them to be truthful stories while I studied, but rather fictional fairytales that were intriguing based on its historical value. Then, something happened. I realize that I didn’t believe in most of what I was reading. …

And when I finally did, my life began to transform.

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Photo by Will Turner on Unsplash

We all like to be right. We all love to prove our rightness. It’s satisfying to know we were right about something, and we may even relish in the fact that someone else is wrong about something. When we are right, it helps us build up our self-worth and perhaps maintain a reputation of intelligence and intellect. Being right isn’t about objectivity. It’s more of a symbol of status. And when I let go of trying so very hard to be right all the time, life changed for the better.

Humility hasn’t been an easy lesson for me. Neither was being humbled by various life experiences that taught me to look at the glass half full. In therapy, years ago, I found myself with a tendency to focus on just one primary issue. That was improving the quality of my relationship with my mom and learning how to effectively communicate while avoiding an explosive temper. And so many years later, I have finally mastered the art of letting go of my rightness. …

The answer is no. And it might even be harmful to.

outdoor shower head spewing water luxurious hotel rainwater shower head
outdoor shower head spewing water luxurious hotel rainwater shower head
Photo by Chandler Cruttenden on Unsplash

When we look at the way our ancestors lived, especially in certain parts of the world, most of them did not prioritize showering. Sure, they may have smelled like a mixture of body odor, halitosis, and feces, but everyone did so there was no shame in smelling. Many ancient societies bathed by standing in the rain or by washing by the stream. And now in 2020, the ideals of being clean has completely transformed into this elusive ideal that is seemingly unattainable.

I say this because it seems that every second of every day, some company is trying to sell me a product to make me cleaner. Whether it be a new razor, a special soap, or an elaborate nail kit, being clean has become an American standard for likability, professionalism, and overall value as a person. …

About

Susie Pinon

B.A. in Psych. Lover of all things green. Likely to be found brewing tea or making a mess in the kitchen. Boisterous, creative, free-spirited. Vegan.

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